Procedural Justice Research Applied to Judicial Behavior in Settlement Sessions   Leave a comment

Guest Post by Bobbie McAdoo, Professor, Hamline University School of Law

A new book, The Multi-Tasking Judge (Thomson Reuters, Tania Sourdin and Archie Zariski, eds.) contains a chapter that readers of this blog will find interesting: “The Application of Procedural Justice Research to Judicial Actions and Techniques in Settlement Sessions.” (Available to download at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2282055)  The co-authored chapter (Nancy Welsh, Professor at Penn State Dickinson School of Law, Donna Stienstra, Senior Researcher at the Federal Judicial Center, and Bobbi McAdoo, Professor at Hamline University School of Law) contains a work-in-progress questionnaire designed to assess lawyers’ perceptions of the procedural justice offered in judicial settlement sessions. The questionnaire could potentially have multiple users: judges seeking confidential feedback on their management of settlement sessions; individual courts or court systems seeking systematic information regarding their judges’ settlement efforts; and those working on larger empirical research projects.

The questionnaire asks about: 1) the concrete judicial actions that occur during settlement sessions; 2) the relationship between these concrete actions and lawyers’ (and clients’) perceptions of procedural and substantive justice; and 3) the influence of contextual factors upon such perceptions (e.g., whether the settlement judge is the presiding judge, whether the judicial action occurred in joint session or caucus, etc). The lawyer questionnaire is the first of a planned set of questionnaires on judicial settlement that will eventually include questionnaires for clients and judges.

Readers of this blog are invited to send comments and suggestions to the authors for the next iteration of the questionnaire; and/or to offer assistance in pre-testing the questionnaire. Nancy Welsh is at nxw10@psu.edu; Donna Stienstra is at dstienst@fjc.gov; Bobbi McAdoo is at bmcadoo@hamline.edu.

The chapter also provides an interesting brief contextual history of judicial settlement in the U.S., including the evolution of relevant rules of civil procedure and judicial ethics provisions and the current state of judicial performance evaluation.

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